Category: Clemency

Press: Hollywood Podcast – From ‘Friday Night Lights’ To ‘Clemency’, Aldis Hodge Is Making His Mark On Hollywood

Friday, Jan 10, 2020

 

DEADLINE – Aldis Hodge has been acting since he was a child, but he caught the attention of Hollywood when he starred in the acclaimed Texas high school football drama Friday Night Lights as Ray “Voodoo” Tatum, the stone-faced, “I’m not here to make friends” Dillon Panthers quarterback who posed problems for Coach Taylor and the team. From there, Hodge continued have career glow-up as he landed roles in numerous TV series and films including the critically acclaimed Underground as well as the features Straight Outta Compton and Hidden Figures. Most recently he stars opposite Kevin Bacon in the Showtime drama City on a Hill and gives a stirring performance in a pair of prison reform dramas that includes the Tom Shadyac-directed Brian Banks and Chinonye Chukwu’s prison reform drama Clemency, which he co-stars with Alfre Woodard.

With an extensive resume of TV series and films, Hodge is determined to leave an impact by telling stories with his craft. He isn’t looking to stop anytime soon as he continues to impress with his focus, determination and career choices — and just today, Deadline exclusively broke the news that he’d be playing football legend Jim Brown in Regina King’s feature directorial debut, One Night in Miami. He stopped by Deadline’s New Hollywood Podcast to talk about how his family inspired and nurtured his career and what he wants to tackle next. Listen to the episode below.

 

 

Press: ‘Clemency’ Star Really Did Bang His Head in Key Death Row Prison Scene

Friday, Jan 10, 2020

 

THE WRAP – TheWrap Oscar magazine: “I misjudged my distance, but it was worth it,” the actor says

This story about Beanie Feldstein and Kaitlyn Dever first appeared in the Actors/Directors/Screenwriters issue of TheWrap’s Oscar magazine.

Aldis Hodge had a mission in 2019 for his acting career: to find roles that challenged the status quo. As the calendar turns to 2020, it’s safe to say he accomplished that goal.

At the start of the year, Hodge left audiences at Sundance stunned silent in “Clemency,” Chinonye Chukwu’s jury prize-winning drama about how enforcing the death penalty not only dehumanizes and emotionally destroys the condemned but also takes a spiritual toll on those who carry out the execution. Hodge goes to extremes as death row inmate Anthony Woods, from violently attempting to take his death into his own hands to shutting down completely as the prison warden, played by Alfre Woodard, calmly explains how the state will kill him.

“For Anthony Woods, that scene where he tries to kill himself is the most dignity he could possibly give himself,” Hodge said. “I did seriously hit my head, though. I misjudged my distance, but it was worth it because every audience I’ve seen that scene with has the exact same reaction and they can see what it’s really like in there.”

To prepare for the role, Hodge took a tour of San Quentin with prison inmates serving life sentences. He was shown the execution chamber and the machine used to administer lethal injection but was not allowed to speak with any of the death row inmates. Such isolation factored into Hodge’s performances, as he noted that it is just another way that those sentenced to death are dehumanized.

“There’s differences in how the death row inmates are treated all the way down to their dying breath. Anthony was in that process for 15 years by the time we meet him in the film. One can only imagine how you find faith, hope and belief when you’re sitting there, waiting for death.”

“Clemency” is one of three roles Hodge has taken this year that challenges our society’s sense of justice. He also starred in the true-story drama “Brian Banks” about a former football prospect whose life was destroyed by a false rape accusation. He’s also tackled how racism in the criminal justice system affects those who enforce it in the Showtime series “City on a Hill,” in which he plays a Boston district attorney trying to do seek justice in a power structure dominated by white men.

“I just went with the nature of the roles that crossed my path,” he said. “For me as an actor, I hope to be part of a progressive conversation that challenges how we live our daily lives. These roles sort of lined up and I went with the flow of things, but they’re all roles in stories that I’m proud to be a part of.”

 

 

Gallery: HEPA and THR Golden Globe Party and AFI Fest for “Clemency” Premiere

Wednesday, Nov 20, 2019

 

 

Gallery Links:

PUBLIC APPEARANCES > 2019 > NOV 14: HFPA AND THR GOLDEN GLOBE AMBASSADOR PARTY – PRESS CONFERENCE

PUBLIC APPEARANCES > 2019 > NOV 17: AFI FEST 2019 PRESENTED BY AUDI – “CLEMENCY” PREMIERE

Press: 2019 SCAD Savannah Film Festival: ‘Clemency’ star Aldis Hodge talks return to Savannah, finding empathy in his character

Tuesday, Oct 29, 2019

DO SAVANNAH: Aldis Hodge is all about the craft and he wants to impart that on the SCAD students at this year’s festival.

One of the 13 honorees at this year’s festival, Hodge is ready to speak with the next generation and start a dialogue that could lead them to great things. He has found great things on his own. He is currently starring alongside Alfre Woodard in the critically-acclaimed “Clemency,” which follows a prison warden who must confront the psychological and emotional demons her job creates, ultimately connecting her to the man she is sanctioned to kill.

Do Savannah spoke with Hodge about his new role and what research went into crafting it, but also about what he hopes to impart on the students as he plans a masterclass during the festival.

 

Q: Aldis, first congratulations on the recognition for the festival. What did you make of the honor?

Hodge: I was surprised. I remember my first time getting introduced to SCAD. I think was like 2016 when I was there (in Savannah filming) ‘Underground.’ We had a panel there (at SCAD). But getting to experience the full magnitude of what SCAD is and what they’ve done and accomplished over the years. So for me to be a part of that, I very humbled. And, you know, this is new for me to be, you know, acknowledged so I’m like, all right. Absolutely.

I’m really excited to see what some of the programs (at the festival are). I’m hopefully (going to) get to see some of the other folks down there. I just worked with Elisabeth Moss so hopefully we get to cross paths down there and then Camila Morrone, we were just having some fun together. I know she’s going to be down there so it’d be cool to just, you know, cross that and be able to catch up. Also, I’ve been given the opportunity to give a masterclass while I’m down there, so I’m pretty excited about that. I’ve never taught a class. I’ve worked individually when it comes to acting as well, I’m excited to see what that turns out to be.

Q: That’s great, What kind of knowledge are you looking to impart on the students?

Hodge: I think the best way to be a teacher is to understand you’re still a student. I’m still learning a lot. You can learn a lot from the people that you’re trying to teach, but the best way to work with people is to figure out who they are. I can’t go at them with the assumption I know so much more than them regardless of the experience, but it does matter. I know that every person there has something that makes them great. So what I’m searching for is that thing that makes them great and seeing if I can help them identify more and define it more so that they can always call on it and know exactly how to how to pull it out when they need to execute it because the beautiful thing about our craft is that we’re all individuals and that’s what makes it interesting. So I just want to see I want to experience you know what these students actually have to teach me honestly.

Q: Real quickly on Savannah, you were here extensively for ‘Underground,’ is there anything about re-visiting the city that you’re looking forward to most?

Hodge: Definitely want to go check out some of the food. I do remember Savannah was a very beautiful place — really relaxing. Nice little place to walk around and just chill for a minute. So I enjoy the flow down there and I’m definitely trying to get some good food, man.

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